It’s an EC!

Aside

The answer to the small building quiz.

The building is an outside earth closet, as they were known here.  A double throne room as Mark so elegantly puts it in his comment.  So these were what was used when there was no flushing loo.  The holes at the base were for some skivvy to rake out the soil into the little walled in midden outside the back of the building.  I’m not sure about the wall, perhaps it was there to prevent woodland animals (pigs (hogs)?) from spreading the stuff all around the place.

There are some good lumps of stone for the lintels and corners (some people will know them as quoins).  Millstone grit is very plentiful as an outcrop rock around here and is/was used extensively all around here as a durable building material, so cheap you can even afford to build your EC from it!

The fisherman is in the bottom right-hand corner, next to the rocks that look like the reflection of a heron.

Deer me, what fools these humans be. Free etching …& bonus quizzes.

Deer course yesterday, photo report.  Above Harvey learns the old art of releasing the hodfast.  Like the nu mallet, WW1 style?

The soup and home-baked roll went down well. Yes some work was done too and everyone went home with a new pet:

But how it will fit in Harvey’s bedroom alongside his 6 foot t. rex head, I’m not sure.

David put a nose on his deer.

So these were sensible people spending a wet Saturday under cover learning hand drilling and round mortise and tenon joints and designing to their taste.  Some space still left on next Saturday’s course and a Christmas present one coming up in January.

However, blimey, sometimes people just are too difficult to understand.  Like the ones who use a flail machine to “trim” hedges, which involves thrashing small saplings half to death. O man! this really hurts me having to drive past the results every day.  I’ll spare you a picture.

Then there’s the ones who just don’t put the right values on stuff.  I found this in a skip.

I used to pass this house name when I was a boy, and at some point it was replaced by a pottery one.  OK I don’t care for the pottery one, but why throw away this old etched and enamelled one? Really, I’ve got to find a home for this without either confusing the postman or changing the name of my business.  If anyone wants it, drop me an email.

I’ve been having a little exchange with Tico Vogt about yew, its sources and uses as I’ve recently acquired a quantity of this poisonous stuff, I had a walk up to see what the grove of yew looks like at the top end of Strid Wood, where I rarely go.

(OK, there’s a massive oak mixed in there too.)

There are some that would be suitable for making longbows, I think, not that I know much about that, but again, why is this nice butt wasting away?  And it will take some time!

Doh!

Anyway, there are some good vistas up at that end of the wood, no wonder people are always coming here for walks.  Here is a view of ruined Barden Tower, once the home of the Shepherd Lord.

Spot the fisherman.

Also there are some softwoods up there, which are getting to look rather majestic.

Also up there is this building:

I’m glad to see the roof has recently been repaired – but riddle me, riddle me, what was it for?

Have a think and I’ll edit the post with a clue tonight.

OK, above’s the clue.

Those Autumn Leaves

Not long ago there were this many leaves on the trees.  Now there are very few.  Not so bad as the form of the trees shows better without leaves.

Both wood stoves are now running at home, so logging is on the agenda.  Today Theo and I found a decent-sized ash deposited in a cut off of the Wharfe.  We’ll be logging it next Tuesday when he’s back for his regular work experience session.

On Sunday morning (a work day for me) three chaps were busy clearing rabbits from a neighbouring farmer’s field using ferrets and purse nets.

They looked to have quite a haul of game.  These creatures were introduced as a source of food for the wealthy in warrens (some of them royal), but inevitably nature got the better of us and they ran wild, now there are lots of rabbits, and some think too many.  It’s getting to the same pass with pheasants, which look like becoming a popular garden bird (even though they were introduced from Georgia!)

I’ve been busy in the bodgery making deer and table centre pieces:

These boards and the deer are available in my shop.

Woods across the border

I’ve been away in Cumbria for the day with Coppice Association North West in Moss & Heights Spring wood.  It was a good day, and good to meet a few more woody folk.  It was a bit damp at first and the fire was a bit of a challenge:

But it came good in the end:

How much woods vary, this one had a much more open feeling than Strid which lies in a steep valley.  Here the views were open up to the Lake District with its mountains (the lower southern ones in the top picture above)

Some coppicing was done, until Twiggy hit an unseen length of wire with her chainsaw.  She luckily escaped with a minor puncture to her face, could have been a lot worse (and yes the helmet vizor was down).

This was my first experience of proper coppice cutting for useful material.

Only a half-dozen members turned up so it wasn’t a lot of work, but some useful stuff was produced for working on.  I took away birch for elves, shrink pots and spoons.  Others were taking the birch tops for besoms.

Two dogs were out – Jim’s Tilly and Mike’s labrador dog. Tilly’s a typical Jack Russel – here hunting mice:

Reminded me of our old Spot the dog.  Tilly is very protective of her territory, and rather coquettish with Mike’s dog. Her she is reclining in her barge:

I’m hoping to be doing some coppicing nearer home next, fingers crossed.