Planing not.

Left the planes at home today when I needed an 16″x5″ planed board. But I did have the axe and draw knife.imageimageGah, who needs a plane?

imageOn with the job…imageMostly carved anyway. Just needs to fit together…


Second iPad in one year, hope the case is as tough as it claims to be.

Now need to stain (very dark I think) and oil, and then a few Sugru feet, I’ve drilled four holes to hold ’em, then I won’t need to put it on a mat on the table!.

Mind you those edges look a little bare, perhaps a simple running pattern, maybe the one I found in Beverley Minster.


Fixing things up


Assorted fire and weather damaged ridge components.

Today I have been mainly fixing the ridge poles on The Bodgery.  The flue pipe from the lil wood burner stove (Do you mean that stack of fire bricks on two lorry wheels? -Ed) was fixed to the side A frame at the ridge.  Some days the tar gets a bit thick inside and we have a roaring chimney fire – cleans it out well, but the pipe gets a little hot and so do things around it. The ridge juts out into the open and gets plenty of rain and sun, beech and sycamore can only stand so much of that treatment and after 8 years have given up the ghost.

Rolled back the tarps after unfastening a couple of dozen or so ropes and misc. wire and bungee fastenings. Shored up the rafters for the back elevation of the roof, well they’ve been shored up for about a month waiting for me to get round to this.


New load-bearing ridge half way up with shoring holding the back poles up.

Made me blink a bit with all that light.  The benches, chopping block and lathe make good foot stools, but there are no steps up to them, so rather an energetic, stretchy day.  I put in two poles at the ridge.  One to carry the back poles and one to take the tarp above the level of the rafter ends.


One ridge good, two ridges better for the tarp.


Pull over that sheet there boy.

Then on with the tarp.  I have two – a white under sheet for light reflection and a green very heavy duty one on top.


Good to have the sign boards back up off the floor.

OK there are another half dozen kicking about around the sides over the shop, making a porch, stopping the rain at the lathe tool end and one in reserve to unroll when the vile East wind blows.

Got that stove pipe away from the inflammables a bit:


Oversized ash ridge with heat protection, need to think about weather protection now. In the meantime it’s the luxury of carefree chimney fires.

Thank goodness for forked branches. what useful shoring up tools


Never cut a forked branch end off.

Fixed the pole lathe treadle again too, the last fix has only lasted a few months, the bike tyre I have used as a hinge for quite a while just broke in two.  Decided to use a redundant safety belt from the Land Rover.  First job was to make a tool to burn self-sealing holes:


Yeah! Another used chainsaw file re-purposed.

I used a new lacing technique instead of the lashing method I’ve used previously.


We’ll see how it lasts.


Double treadle.  Note the hob nails for icy weather.

Had a weekend away in East Yorkshire and found a nice minimalist chisel&punch pattern in the choir stalls

English: Beverley Minster, Beverley, East Ridi...

English: Beverley Minster, Beverley, East Riding of Yorkshire, England (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

at Beverley Minster …


Had to copy it – it’s now a frieze on a chopping board.

Looks like they used a chisel that didn’t reach long enough to do the lines in one go.  That screw has got to be a much later repair.  There were some great misericords, of course I had to be sitting on top of five fools.

Also found some neat flowers growing on the porch of St Mary’s – the other church in Beverley.









Going to master this style of carving one day.  But I’ll never be as good as this guy:


Surprising oak grave ‘stone’ by Mr ‘Mousey’ Thompson late of Kilburn.

Also found a series of informal porch decorations – done by foresters, I’ll be bound.


Halved pine dressings.

Regional Furniture Society 2014, gouge work

The Regional Furniture Society’s 2014 journal arrived a few days ago, and I must say it’s an excellent read!

SAMSUNG CSCSorry, not breaking copyright, you’ll have to join – worth it just for this journal alone.  There is an American secretary too.

I’ve just read a really well researched and presented article about a press cupboard made in the Lake District.  It includes a detailed analysis of the carving by chisel type.  Brilliant.  I think it would be a good discipline to analise carving in this fashion as background to my 17th century-style carving (And lots more practice. – Ed.).

New logo for the Landy:


Stools, hazel and a building site

My wimping on about not getting a prize for my 3 legger caused a couple of comments about voting (notably from  Eric Bloodax Rick McKee, master hewer).  I’ve never tried this before so I thought I’d set up a poll, just for fun, and you should be able to see this in the right sidebar (may need to scroll down a bit or go to the “Home” page until I find out why if you go to an individual post no right sidebar info shows grrr!)).

Just to remind you, here are the stools in question:


The three legger (Must get that focus sorted man! -Ed).


The 4 legger with pretty flowers (Are these shots taken in a stone quarry? -Ed).


Also ran.

Enjoy your voting – you can see the results with a simple click, unlike the retro polling of the political variety.

At the moment I feel a bit like a square peg in a round hole, bursting to fit in, where is that fitting hole?  Where is the support for 17th century joinery?  Should I try the Worshipful Company of Joiners? Am I just too square?

SAMSUNG CSCThe rubbly background to the photos is the rebuild of my workshop, don’t worry, once the masons have finished there will be some timber included, watch this space.

SAMSUNG CSCThe season of woodland deer is ‘pon us once again and my stocks of animal limbs, and antlers was woefully low, so I had a half day cutting the hazel coppice at Wood Nook.  At lunchtime I had a walk round previous years’ cut stools and some regrowth is pretty good


Some is rather poor, but still has a chance – if the deer will only leave it alone:

SAMSUNG CSCBut around 25% have died 😦


Helmsley & Sinnington

We ventured into East Yorkshire (no passport required) today.

English: Steep bend on Sutton Bank

English: Steep bend on Sutton Bank (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Market day Colourful vegetable stall ...

English: Market day Colourful vegetable stall in Helmsley market. Church tower in the background. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)







There we spotted quite a few Yorkshire sash windows (my favourites!):

SAMSUNG CSCAll three upstairs windows in this cottage are Yorkshire sashes.  That is the middle section (or left section on the far right window) slides horizontally inside the fixed frames to open.  The middle one is partly open. This is effected by simply grooving the top and bottom of the frame to fit a small square batten screwed onto the top and bottom of the window lining.

In this unfinished new-build crescent they have added some Yorkshire sashes.


Looked quite promising.  The detail started to tell another story:

SAMSUNG CSCOK some Yorkshire sashes (and the regular type here too), but what has happened to that walling at the right of the gate? Really.  Then we took a butchers at the rear, to discover what was happening to these lower ground floor rooms – Blimey!


Quite a maze!

Rather more satisfactory was the heavily restored (read Victorian) church complete with many gargoyles:

SAMSUNG CSCAfter a smashing lunch at the Fox and Hounds in Sinnington my brother suggested we go up to the Norman Hall and church at the top of the village.

SAMSUNG CSCAbove is the Norman hall.  Now restored but not open to the public.  It had fallen into use as a farm barn, check out the missing 5 light South window, now a forking hole with just the two outermost jambs showing.  The Norman heads to the doors are very fine.

SAMSUNG CSCThe church sits just across the lane and is also Norman, in the main.


SAMSUNG CSCThis West door is splendid, why ever was it walled up?

SAMSUNG CSCAnd why did they add in all the celtic masonry they could find?  More of this inside:

SAMSUNG CSC SAMSUNG CSC SAMSUNG CSCSome good clean wood carving too:

SAMSUNG CSCThis panel is repeated on all the pew ends.  The punch work is not unlike mine on “the chair”.

Interesting carving with removed background.


But seemed to run out of space at the end … (hart? heart?)

SAMSUNG CSCI’ve seen this doomsome memento mori poem before, but the spelling and orthography seems to have gone a little awry again.  Fine engraving, nonetheless.


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Location of the ceremonial county of the East ...

Location of the ceremonial county of the East Riding of Yorkshire within England. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)








Back from Derbyshire


I’ve just returned from an excellent bowl-carving course run by Robin Wood in Edale, Derbyshire.

I went via Halifax which I must say, I’d forgotten contains some fine stone buildings:

The course was held in the tidy little village hall and I stayed in the YHA with a couple of other course members.

Mind you it didn’t stay tidy for long – seven people hacking away at logs carving swedish bowls for two and a half days produced quite a good number of sacks of shavings.

Robin is an inspired and inspirational teacher and I’m sure everyone had a great time, if they got as much out of it as did I. We all produced decent bowls and learnt important techniques.

I made a couple of curvy bowls, I am very pleased with the second, boat-shaped one. A little more work needed but the form is there.

An important part of the course was learning how the look at what you’re working on and what are the essential parts to concentrate on, like the main lines of the form, if you want to find out more book onto one of Robin’s courses, he also runs spoon making courses which are a little less physically demanding and a good introduction to the joys of making useful things with your hands from green wood. You can buy tools from him too,

read books and chat over tea, coffee biscuits and excellent home-made lunches served on wooden ware and eaten with wooden spoons, even the tea and coffee containers deserve close study:

I also met a bunch of very interesting people with common interests

All in all an excellent outing. Expect extravagant hand carved bowls coming to this blog soon!


What a great place for an afternoon out,  Yorkshire Sculpture Park at Bretton Hall.  Even found an oversized froe:

There was some stunning marble sculpture work by Peter Randall Page.

Some were outside, and there were lots inside (no photography!)

Well worth a visit, and I’m looking forward to the exhibition of David Nash’s work from May 2010.  Amazingly solid sculptures in wood like this:

We’ve also been taking a leisurely look at my other favourite, brewing:

This is a Yorkshire Square fermentation vessel at Black Sheep Brewery at Masham, N Yorkshire.  It’s a traditional method of fermentation developed in The West Riding of Yorkshire, using slate slabs and a separate floor near the top where the yeast head collects and then is sprayed with the fermenting beer once an hour.  The old part of the brewery is in the kilning area of a former maltsters:

After Masham we drove down to Lotherton Hall near Leeds.  An intriguing Edwardian furnished mansion.  This piece especially caught my eye, way out of period being 16th century, but much easier on the eye than e.g. the sycamore inlaid grand piano:

There was a pair of really good stools the like of which I’ve never seen before:

Deeply dished seat and three curved legs through tenonned into the seat which was cunningly much thicker in the middle underneath.  Looks really comfortable, but sadly no chance of trying it out without leather trousers as protection.