Sometimes

I think I make life hard for myself sometimes.

I make garden benches in a particular style.  The style avoids many square angles, straight edges and all those luxuries that make joinery easy to fit together.

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Starting assembly

Who else would use round peeled oakwood for a crest rail, combined with slabbed waney-edged chestnutwood for a saltire back, and riven hedgerow oak for end frames?

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Embryonic end frames

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Saltire components

Making mortise & tenon joints can be demanding; just how does one lay out the two joints to fit the armrests – where does the front through tenon fall, much deliberation, center finding, and, well, some guess-work, I guess.

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Chase the mortise

I’ve found that a full-sized drawing can help with some dimensions.

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How long’s that arm rest to be?

Starts to come together gradually.

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Getting there

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Later

I should stick to helping people make bears.

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Bear & fox.

But then, there is some reward in going out on a limb.

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Clothes rack detail.

Reusing 17th century carving motifs.

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Sycamore chopping board

Redesigning the iPad from the outside:

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Thicker, heavier.

Ah, perhaps life’s not so bad, after all, I do have the privilege of living in God’s Own County (Yorkshire, where it’s always sunny).

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Culloden Tower, Richmond, North Yorkshire

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Richmond, Yorkshire

IMG_0288Cockpit Millennium Garden, Richmond Castle

Those Autumn Leaves

Not long ago there were this many leaves on the trees.  Now there are very few.  Not so bad as the form of the trees shows better without leaves.

Both wood stoves are now running at home, so logging is on the agenda.  Today Theo and I found a decent-sized ash deposited in a cut off of the Wharfe.  We’ll be logging it next Tuesday when he’s back for his regular work experience session.

On Sunday morning (a work day for me) three chaps were busy clearing rabbits from a neighbouring farmer’s field using ferrets and purse nets.

They looked to have quite a haul of game.  These creatures were introduced as a source of food for the wealthy in warrens (some of them royal), but inevitably nature got the better of us and they ran wild, now there are lots of rabbits, and some think too many.  It’s getting to the same pass with pheasants, which look like becoming a popular garden bird (even though they were introduced from Georgia!)

I’ve been busy in the bodgery making deer and table centre pieces:

These boards and the deer are available in my shop.